What Do RV Inspections Look Like And Why Should You Have One?
Using A Mobile RV Service Before Buying Your RV

Buying a good car within a 50 mile radius is entirely feasible today, but to find an RV that meets your needs (and agrees with your wallet) you often have to expand your search area--not only by miles, but often by states. There are a lot of options. And there's no better way to ensure that you are getting what you pay for with your option than to send a mobile RV tech to inspect it before you buy.

As a mobile RV tech myself, I've had clients from all over the U.S. fly me out or pay me to drive to inspect a prospective purchase of theirs, and for them this is absolutely a MONEY SAVING INVESTMENT. I'll tell you why below.

Already Bought It?

Already have your RV? Find out when using a mobile RV service is time efficient and cost effective for you, whether you are a new or an experienced RV'er.

Regardless of if you're looking for a trailer, a mid-size motor home, or a full-size diesel pusher, having it inspected is one the most important parts of your pre-purchase decision. As an RV tech, I know the systems and I'll be able to make sure everything is functioning correctly so that you won't be hit with any surprises or costly repairs that could have been prevented right off the bat.

What do RV inspections consist of?

During my inspections, I check operation of all the major systems, as well as things you may not think of at the time of purchase, or use until months after you've bought the RV.

I use a "Pre Delivery Inspection" (PDI) Sheet and check all your water lines, propane lines (including fittings and connections), every appliance and added feature for operation--satellite, solar, holding tanks, awnings, etc. I also double check to make sure your roof condition is in good shape.

Do the ACs blow cold? Does the furnace work safely and efficiently as it should? Is there any hidden wood rot? Is all the lighting inside and out functioning properly? These are questions I put a trained eye and considerable amount of time into answering, so you don't have to.

A Common Problem: Buying a coach with no brake lights or malfunctioning windshield wipers happens all the time and can be expensive to repair. You need to know that all of these things are working and in order before you invest.

Does the back-up camera work? Automatic leveling systems are all computerized now and can be very expensive to troubleshoot and repair--does yours work?

Almost every appliance has a computer circuit board to operate the system. Refrigerators, furnaces, waterheaters, and cooling systems, for example, all have these computers in them... Do they work?

I inspect from bumper to bumper to ensure that you, the buyer, will have no surprises after your big investment.

I check to make sure the compartment storage doors inside and out will open and close correctly. Body parts are hard to find on coaches over three years old and almost impossible if the manufacturer has gone out of business. So if an exterior compartment door is damaged and not available, this is crucial information to know before you buy the unit.

I make sure your 110V outlets are safe and the GFI works and protects as it should. Converters or inverters, I inspect and make sure they work as they should and the battery system is charged and functional.

I review and make sure all recall's have been done to appliances and if I find out they have not I inform you that they will need to be done before or after you buy.

If you buy in the middle of the summer, checking the furnaces are often never thought of, and if you buy in the cold of winter making sure the AC's blow cold can be easily overlooked. If the RV you're looking to buy is in an area where winters are cold and it snows, has the water system and holding tanks been damaged from freezing? I check all of this during the inspection.

Batteries only have a life of about 5 years, so it's important to know how old the batteries in the unit are. Do you have tires with no miles on them? They look brand new, but if not taken care of (like from being parked in the direct sun light) the side walls crack and can be dangerous if they blow on the highway, and expensive to have to replace them all.

Sun damages to the exterior and oxidation on fiberglass sides can be a nightmare to have removed. The same goes for the roof. Does the roof on your prospective RV need to be sealed? Roof vents, AC covers, and skylights all deteriorate in the sun also, so it's important to know the condition of these before you buy.

If the owner has maintenance records, I review them to make sure that everything that has been due for maintenance has been taken care of.

I've been sent by prospective buyers to inspect more than a half dozen coaches before they found one in good shape. Don't get caught buying the one they passed on.

Do you think you need a pre-purchase RV inspection like the one described above? Let Warford's RV Service work for you. Get in touch with us to send an RV Tech to inspect BEFORE you make the big investment... It could save you 1000's of dollars.


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Looking for an RV inspection?
Call Robbie from Warford's RV Service at:
(619) 443-0004
or email Robbie directly here.


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Robbie Warford, San Diego RV Repair

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